The Gadsden Times of Gadsden, Etowah County, Alabama

Look for the link to search the index of each volume for the names you are researching (links will work as the volume indexes are added).  You can purchase the entries separately ($5.00 for the first item and $1 each for the next items--more than one citation of the same surname on a page counts as ONE citation or if an article is continued to a next page it still counts as one citation) or the entire book if there are lots of entries.  Be aware that many entries are nothing more than a list of letters at the post office or a subscription to the newspaper. However, you may find articles containing wonderful information about your family or an event. Please be patient as this part of the page is being developed.



The Gadsden Times includes letters, descriptive articles, and obituaries of people who moved to and from the Northeast Alabama region to other parts of the south.  These often give very specific information about relationships to Alabama families as well as where the families moved and whether they stayed.  These abstracts include any article or advertisement that mentioned persons by name or locations or local historical events.

  • Volume I 1867-1871  is a library-bound, 367-page book which includes two indexes;one is an index of titles of articles in the newspaper.  The general index includes not only names, but also events and locations to be used as a finding aid.  Three different editors during this period display their own unique personalities and opinions about almost everything and every-one.  
$55.00 postage paid

Be sure to include the volume number(s) along with the surname(s) and page number(s).


  • Volume II 1872-1875, also library-bound, is a 743 page book with a very inclusive index. 
$70.00 postage paid
    SEARCH THE INDEX FOR VOLUME II 1872-1875
    Be sure to include the volume number(s) along with the surname(s) and page number(s).

        • Volume III 1876-1880 continues with 909 pages full of many stories which give character to our ancestors.  Some of these unusual stories included sightings of water monsters in the Coosa river, who came to Civil War reunions, church meetings and conferences and who attended, letters left at the post office, those who renewed their subscriptions to The Gadsden Times, items placed in cornerstones of Gadsden's modern new buildings, and, finally, news in Texas. Many families during this time period, and before, immigrated to Texas.  Not only did Mr. MEEKS name names, but he also continued to publish news from Texas for the benefit of those parts of the families who stayed behind in Alabama. 
        $75.00 postage paid 
        SEARCH THE INDEX FOR VOLUME III 1876-1880.  
        Be sure to include the volume number(s) along with the surname(s) and page number(s).

          • Volume IV 1881-1885  is an 8½"x 11" library-bound volume with 855 pages including a very extensive index. The Gadsden Times in the early 1880's shows life heating up in northeast Alabama.  Gadsden becomes a modern city with telephones, gas street lights, and water works.  The Gadsden Times continues to grow, but it now has a little competition.  The Gadsden News, published by W.P. JOHNSON, finds a niche and for the year 1884 apparently becomes the official organ of Etowah County.  As a reminder, we have these wonderful newspapers today because the Alabama State Legislature enacted a law requiring the keeping in the county probate offices of the official  newspaper for public announcements.  We are sure that that is the reason that for 1884 only there is no Gadsden Times surviving, but The Gadsden News was kept–-it was the organ for official publications announcements.  During these five years, the Coosa River continues to be a major force in the economy of the area.  The railroad, though, has finally arrived in Gadsden as a force instead of just a local connection to Attalla where the main roads run.  Of course, the railroad eventually took over as the transportation of choice.  A fire on July 4, 1883, costing over $100,000 ($10,000 insured value) consumed 26 businesses in Gadsden on Broad Street.  This forever changed how the city allowed buildings to be built.  No more wooden structures were built on Broad Street–brick buildings were mandatory.  In 1884, a Democratic President, Grover Cleveland, was elected.  Even though, technically, reconstruction was over, a President embraced by the South gave the South the boost that it needed to start a new modern era.  Entertainment, too, became more modern in Gadsden.  A  roller-skating rink proved extremely popular, and Gadsden fielded a baseball team named the Gadsden Red Jackets.  KYLE's Opera House continued to draw traveling troups of performers.
          $75.00 postage paid

          SEARCH THE INDEX FOR VOLUME IV 1881-1885
          Be sure to include the volume number(s) along with the surname(s) and page number(s).

          • Volume V 1886-? is in the works.  It will be a while before it is available.  Consideration is being given to producing it in electronic format as a way to keep the cost low.  The goal is to include five years, 1886-1890.  The newspaper, however, got larger and larger so it will be a very unwieldy physical book.  The electronic publication may be the answer to that.  Something will be worked out for libraries.  Feedback would be appreciated.

          SEARCH THE INDEX FOR VOL V 1886-????
          Be sure to include the volume number(s) along with the surname(s) and page number(s).

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